Guide, Sports

Boxing Safety and Health Problems

I did some boxing and coached boxers in the Navy. Our highlight achievements were invitations to appear on local TV to participate in some all-service bouts. I won’t confess how many years ago this was, but you can guess when I tell you the TV was black and white and broadcast was live from a downtown arena. When I bragged to friends to look for me during the bouts, all they saw of me was my rear end. The only TV camera at the bout was facing into the ring from behind our corner, and the operator was too lazy to move it between rounds, and it was focused on me as I worked on our team’s boxers.

I did Navy boxing aboard an aircraft carrier during the Korean War, and later, athletic coaching for three summers as a Naval Reserve CPO, volunteering for 90-day active duty assignments each summer while I was a college and grad student. Because you may have guessed the years involved by now, I’ve give you my statistics. As a middleweight boxer, I won 18 bouts and lost six, and fortunately for all concerned, none by knockout. With my Navy teams of summer sailors, we won 27 and lost 23. All right, I didn’t say we were good.

Not that I’m an expert on today’s boxing scene, especially when it now competes with all the violent combinations with judo, kick-boxing and those insane, bloody brawls called extreme fighting. There are basically two kinds of boxing, the seldom-seen-today style where the opponents try to score non-damaging hits on each other, similar to the way fencers do with their button-tipped swords. No one tries to hurt anyone, and the guy who scores the most legal hits wins. In most amateur fights, for safety’s sake, the boxers wear padded gear on their heads, groins, and fight with very heavily padded gloves.

The other form of boxing, virtually the only kind you see today, requires each opponent to beat the hell out of the other until one falls down unconscious, or they end in a draw or decision while the two bloody guys embrace. The pros don’t wear head guards, but do wear padded jocks and fight with much smaller gloves. In some of the more brutal variations of anything-goes-fights, the opponents wear small, partial gloves or none at all. This harks back to the bare-knuckle fights of 100 years ago, in the days of John L. Sullivan and James J. Corbett.

Today’s professional boxing is, allegedly for the safety of the contestants, tightly controlled by official state commissions. In non-profit boxing, there are also governing bodies within college and amateur associations.

Bouts are usually supervised by a panel of judges, and a qualified physician must be in attendance. The physician usually has total control throughout the bout, and can abruptly end a bout when he considers one of the boxers badly injured or can no longer defend himself for any other reason.

Professional and some amateur boxers have to meet strict pre-fight standards, including meeting weight division limits, undergo frequent health exams and comply with other requirements. Today, most boxers who show any signs of severe cuts, bone damages or other serious injuries in the ring, and with the ring doctor’s recommendation, are required to be taken to hospitals for thorough examinations, particularly if brain injury is suspected.

Despite all the safety issues on the books, two women boxers died of ring injuries in recent years: Stacy Young in 2003 and Becky Zerlentes in 2005. Beethavean Scottland lost a light heavyweight bout with George Khalid Jones in 2001 on the USS Intrepid. He was helpless when the bout was stopped in the 10th round. He never regained consciousness. Bobby Tomasello fought Steve Dotse to a draw in 2000, but after he left the ring, he went home, fell asleep and never woke up. Autopsies showed that the women and men had suffered severe head trauma over several years, and the accumulation of injury, rather than their final fights, was the cause of death.

There are still many injuries in both professional and amateur boxing, and several recorded deaths a year in various parts of the boxing world. I’m talking about legitimate, traditional boxing. I can’t even guess how many injuries and deaths are caused by the ever-more brutal ultimate or extreme fights that are becoming more popular every year. The damage of being punched in the head repeatedly may not cause immediate death, but the injuries frequently are factors in severe brain damage that years later have terrible results. The term punch drunk is no joke to boxers. One of the greatest of all time, Mohammed Ali, who was an expert at self defense, was almost totally physically handicapped by brain injuries before he reached age 50.

In conclusion, boxing is one of the few sports that requires not only practice of attack but of self defense as well due to it being too risky to try at home. Boxers are trained athletes and it takes months of practice for them to perfect their moves and punches and their practice is like 토토사이트.